WULF UTIAN’S LETTER FROM CAPE TOWN

APRIL  2020

A COVID-DRIVEN TRIP BACK INTO THE PAST

Lockdown. Quarantine. Pandemic. N-95 Mask. Hand sanitizer. Social distancing. Virtual Passover Seders. Zoom. Terms like these that we could never have dreamed of in our worst nightmares have become the norm in this new frenzied world.

South Africa went into enforced lockdown far earlier in the cycle than countries like the United States or the United Kingdom, with just 402 cases and no deaths. Frozen into our apartment for 3 weeks since midnight March 26 has been a new experience for Moira and me, inveterate travelers that we are.

For us all this is a sobering experience. No physical access to family and friends, day after day trying to remain positive and keep meaningfully occupied, and each of us dealing with our own innate fears and anxieties. Moira and I have exercised together, listened to audiobooks, read, attempted to maintain a healthy and balanced diet, and communicated with family and friends on Skype, Zoom, Facetime, WhatsApp, and the like. Above all, we have spoken frankly to each other of our feelings and concerns.

I am sure that everyone has faced or is facing a personal dilemma. For Moira and me it was an offer on April 1 from the United States Embassy to be given two seats on a charter flight from Cape Town to Washington DC a few days later. Talk about something to really make you decide about what is most important! Our children and grandchildren are in South Africa. Although handling the crisis far better than the United States, SA has entered the pandemic with an already existing failing economy and stressed health system, and the Achilles heel of huge densely populated areas of extreme poverty. The US entered the pandemic with a full deck, the best economy in generations, and a health system to a large extent able to cope. So our Hobson’s choice was accepting the US offer of a charter flight or rejecting it, having no knowledge when any commercial flights would ever resume to get us back to the States. Our choice was a balance to stay close to family and good friends we have here but realize we have no medical safety parachute, or return to the States, quarantine, and one  positive feature, access to better medical care. Fortunately, or unfortunately, the decision was put on hold when the flight fell through. As of this writing we still wait to hear from the US Embassy.

Certain things do strike you in terms of what you hear from family and friends. I am buoyed  by the many good friends who have come up to expectations, but disappointed in others we would have considered to be really close friends who have disappeared, do not respond to emails, or send attachments to  ‘amusing’ trivia on YouTube and the like, but never an email of warmth, friendship or empathy. Then there are those we have not heard from for years who have suddenly come back into our lives in real positive ways.  Live and learn.

Yet the days do have moments of emptiness, too much time to think, consider the horrible possibilities of “what if..?”  So rather than sit in a corner and worry, I decided to look back at some of our key places and experiences of our past many annual visits to South Africa, and share with you some of the illustrative photos that I took.

The following pictorial retrospective is not meant as a travelogue, as places you should consider visiting, and I do not explain anywhere in detail. Some of these photos are from places that I have described in past Letters from Knysna or Cape Town. Rather I offer them to you as photos to peruse, to think about, or simply to enjoy, and take your mind off matters more serious, if only just for a moment.

Over the years there is nothing we have enjoyed more in this country of such diversity than to pack an overnight bag, hit the road, take off into the sidetracks, explore the countryside, stay in small towns, and gossip with the locals.

Often the adventure starts with traversing a mountain pass into a valley ringed by mountains. The first photo shows such a pass, and the Mercedes B180 that was our travel horse for all the trips until recently.

STOPPING AT A REST POINT IN A TYPICAL MOUNTAIN PASS

THE END OF THE PASS AND AN ONCOMING PANORAMA OF A HIDDEN VALLEY

Then we take off at a tangent along a dirt road with a signpost to an unpronounceable destination, and just waiting to see what we find at the end of the road.

NOTHING MORE DELIGHTFUL THAN SLOWLY TRAVERSING THROUGH THE ISOLATED MOUNTAIN ROADS AND COMMUNING WITH NATURE

THIS IS ONE OF THE KIND OF DIRT ROAD WE DELIGHT IN EXPLORING

PHOTO TIME NEAR A LONELY FARMHOUSE

CAPE CACTUS IN A VALLEY RINGED BY MOUNTAINS

Of course, not all roads lead to points we really want, but it is either persist or turn back, and we have rarely ever turned back.

DO WE TAKE A CHANCE OR GO BACK? WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

LUCKILY SOME OF THE ROADS HAVE BRIDGES

Sometimes the best way to enjoy an area is on foot. Hiking remains my favorite outdoor pastime, often alone, or with Moira, or with my friends in my hiking club.

REVELING IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS

ALWAYS CHECK THE WEATHER FORECAST BEFORE HEADING OUT ON THOSE LONELY TRAILS

Other joys of exploration are the delightful, often whimsical, places we discover along the road. Many spring up out of nowhere, and one wonders how they stay in business. Take for example the next picture of a small guest house called, amusingly, Angies G Spot. But read the sign…

THE ‘KAK ACCOMMADATION’ WAS NOT TRUE

Humor is rampant along these dusty side roads. Seems like the people who own, run, and populate these places need a sense of humor, or just put up these signs to make certain you take the time to stop, and come in to chat. The following is a typical example. Tickled Pink was a roadside eating place and wine store.

IN A COUNTRY BESET BY WATER SHORTAGES, THE TRANSLATION IS OF COURSE, “SAVE WATER, DRINK WINE.’

THERE ARE ALWAYS PLACES TO PURCHASE LOCAL FOOD DELICACIES

FOOD IS NEVER A PROBLEM, AND USUALLY A VERY PLEASANT SURPRISE

A FARM RESTAURANT WITH SOUTH AFRICAN CUISINE – DELICIOUS

Some of the small towns are true destinations and cater extremely well to tourists, their life blood. One of our favorite examples of a small town that is worthy of a few days stay is Prince Albert, noteworthy for good accommodation, excellent places to eat, a very friendly population, and fascinating excursions.

PRINCE ALBERT, SITUATED IN A MAGNIFICENT VALLEY, HAS AN INTERESTING HISTORY

FIGS OUT TO DRY AT A FIG FARM IN PRINCE ALBERT

Another of our favorite small towns is Graaff-Reinet, in the middle of the Karoo, suffering severe drought unfortunately, but truly historic with its carefully conserved buildings and homes. It is surrounded by unique national parks, one being the Valley of Desolation.

THE VALLEY OF DESOLATION. WAITING FOR THE SUNSET WAS WORTH THE EXPERIENCE.

THERE WAS A STRONG JEWISH POPULATION IN GRAAFF-REINET

A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF WELL-MAINTAINED EARLY CAPE-DUTCH ARCHITECTURE

ONE OF THE AVENUES OF THE TOWN, A STROLL THROUGH THE HISTORY OF GRAAFF-REINET

Another interesting town is Cradock, not up to the standard of Graaff-Reinet. But a large number of houses in the center have been converted into accommodation and we had a lovely evening exploring and enjoying an excellent dinner in the main building.

ENTRANCE TO THE RECEPTION AT THE MANOR IN CRADOCK

THESE OLD HOUSES ALONG THIS STREET ARE EXAMPLES OF THE INDIVIDUAL HOTEL SUITES

ONE OF THE BEST THINGS ABOUT EXPLORING IS THAT YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT IS AROUND THE BEND. HERE WAS AN UNUSUAL ROCK FORMATION AND I PONDERED HOW IT REMAINS INTACT.

So there you have a taste of our adventures, and I hope this has helped take your mind off other things. I am considering following up with future similar newsletters, as long as we are trapped in lockdown in Cape Town, looking at hiking trails, interesting places we have stayed at, or flowers, or coastal areas, or wildlife experiences, or even photos of some of the food delights we have enjoyed. Hopefully some of you might let me know what you think.  In truth, assembling this newsletter has also made me feel extremely grateful and fortunate for the life I have enjoyed.

Stay well. Stay safe. Stay strong.

As ever,

Wulf

Cape Town, April 8, 2020

10 Comments

  1. Jim Liu says:

    Stay safe. Enjoy the quarantine….time to read and reflect.

  2. Arnie and Joceline says:

    Thanks, Wulf, for your warm and poignant message, with some great and interesting photos.

    We wish you, Moira and your family a happy and healthy Pesach.

    Kind regards
    Arnie and Joceline

  3. Ginsberg Jan says:

    Thank you for your forthright comments on this crisis, how it is unfolding in SA. And thank you as well for the photos of nature and family… these are rays of hope. May you, Moira and your family be safe and stay strong.
    Love, Jan and Bob

  4. Len says:

    Hello Wulf and Moira,
    Having only reconnected with you in December 2019, after more than 60 years (Sydenham days), Myrna and I have not been privy to your previous letters and adventures. This letter has given us a flavour of what was missed. Thank you.
    Living in London and in isolation lockdown for 3 months is beginning to develop new routines, ‘smelling the roses’ so to speak, so we empathise with your sentiments.
    Stay safe and well and you’ll make the right decision when the time comes.
    Len & Myrna

  5. Tobias De Villiers says:

    Fantastic photos! Really enjoyed
    Working on SAPHRA procedure during for Prolia during lockdown

  6. Wulf Utian says:

    Thanks Len and Myrna. You can read previous letters directly from my website http://www.utianllc.com

  7. Ivan and Toni samson says:

    Hi Wulf and Moira, Thanks again for your insights, good wishes and wonderful pics of the South Africa we never explored in days long ago gone by. We too have managed to keep up our spirits, and keep busy with using the amazing technology available to us. Tonight we have a family Zoom Seder planned, and will have to make the most of it. From some of the video clips we’ve seen eg in Alexandria township, with it being impossible to practice isolation or personal distancing, it would appear that a major catastrophe could arise. Lets hope not. Here’s wishing you and your family health and safety in the coming year. Chag Pesach Sameach. Ivan and Toni

  8. Marcie Naftolin says:

    Loved your pictures in a most beautiful place! We are getting ready for our Zoom Seder with the family, or part of it. Thank god for the ability to do this and not feel so isolated! We are all living in new times, go to the supermarket once a week during senior hours, very early in am. But we are lucky we have eachother , a home and we go on, our granddaughter was in Barcelona, brother visited during March break and both returned to US, got sick and gave it to their mom, luckily all ok and recovered at home.
    Stay in, stay well and we love you!
    Marcie and Fred39zM

  9. Hi Wulf & Moira

    We so enjoyed seeing the photographs (very professional) and reminds us all of what life is really about as opposed to what we are living through at present. Some of those photos really brought back happy memories, specially Affie Plasie, which was always our first stop on the way to Plett.

    We are waiting for the time when we can do some exploring in Israel.

    You have really brightened our day with the letter and photos and hope you will continue to do a regular letter.

    Chag Sameach.

    David & Maeve

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